Home Page The Script Download Launch
Points
Terms
of Use
Proceduresclick on an item in the list Thanksclick on an item in the list SAXPAR Win 8
Install
Contact

Frequently Asked Questions

Click on the question to jump to the answer

  1. When I left-click on the download link, the script opens in Notepad. How do I download the script?

  2. I ran the script, but I can’t find the report file it created. Where was it stored?

  3. I double-clicked the script file, but I got a (dire) warning from my antivirus program. What should I do? Is your script dangerous?

  4. I double-clicked the script file, but it just opened in Notepad and all I see is text. How do I run the script?

  5. I double-clicked the script file, but it just opened in Notepad and all I see is text. I don’t have a shortcut for the “Command Prompt” or the “MS‑DOS Prompt” in my Start menu. How do I run the script?

  6. I double-clicked the script file, but I got the error: Could not create object named “WScript.Shell”  What should I do?

  7. I double-clicked the script file, but I got the error: This script requires Windows Management Instrumentation to run. However, I checked and that service is already running. What should I do?

  8. When I run the script, I get a window telling me I have a corrupt WMI installation and recommending that I download and run WMIDiag.vbs. What’s this?

  9. I double-clicked the script file, but I got the error: Windows Script Host access is disabled on this machine. Contact your administrator for details. What should I do?

  10. When I run the script under Windows XP, I get a window telling me about a “CreateTextFile” error? What’s this?

  11. When I run the script, I get some other error message. What should I do?

  12. How do I uninstall Silent Runners?

  13. I downloaded Silent Runners but I can’t find it. Where did it go?

  14. The output file contains “Infection Warnings” <<!>> and/or “Hijack Warnings” <<H>>, but none of them seems to show anything dangerous. Why is the script showing me this stuff?

  15. How did I get infected?

  16. How can I avoid reinfection?

  17. I have another question, but I don’t see it here. How can I get an answer to my question?


Q:  When I click on the download link, the script opens in Notepad. How do I download the script?

 

A:  To download the script, go to the Download page, right-click on the first “here” link and select “Save Target As…” (if you’re using Internet Explorer) or “Save Link As…” (if you’re using Firefox).

top



Q:  I ran the script, but I can’t find the report file it created. Where was it stored?

 

A:  Unless you used a command line parameter, the report file is stored in the same directory as the script. The file name starts with the words "Startup Programs".

top



Q:  I double-clicked the script file, but I got a (dire) warning from my antivirus program. What should I do? Is your script dangerous?

 

A:  Other than creating a text file to store its findings, my script changes nothing on your system. My script is not dangerous. (I’ll prudently add the standard boilerplate: You use my script at your own risk!)

However, the antivirus program doesn’t know anything about my script. It’s doing its job by warning when you launch any script file. I show the way to handle that here for Norton Antivirus. (Note to users of Panda antivirus products — apparently, you can’t authorize a particular VBS script to run, so my script is regretfully incompatible with Panda. If someone has a workaround, please let me know.)

top



Q:  I double-clicked the script file, but it just opened in Notepad and all I see is text. How do I run the script?

 

A:  This peculiar problem is caused by a protective change made to your registry so that double-clicking a VBS script file does not run the script. To run Silent Runners:
  1. Get to a “Command Prompt” by clicking on Start | All Programs | Accessories | Command Prompt.

    It’s called an “MS‑DOS Prompt” in Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Me, and you need to click on Start | Programs | Accessories | MS‑DOS Prompt

  2. Switch to the directory in which the script is stored:

    cd c:\script_directory_name_here

    If you can’t quite figure out where the script is stored, copy or move it to a directory you know how to find, like the root of C: drive:  cd c:\

  3. Run the script with “CSCRIPT.EXE”:

    c:\script_directory_name_here>cscript.exe "Silent Runners.vbs"

    Note that the quotes are mandatory.
top



Q:  I double-clicked the script file, but it just opened in Notepad and all I see is text. I don’t have a shortcut for the “Command Prompt” or the “MS-DOS Prompt” in my Start menu. How do I run the script?

 

A:  This doubly peculiar problem is caused by a protective change made to your registry so that double-clicking a VBS script file does not run the script and a missing shortcut that every installation should have by default. To run Silent Runners:
  1. Click on Start | Run

    In Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000 and Windows XP Home or Pro, type “cmd.exe” without the quotes.

    In Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Millennium, type “command.com” without the quotes.

    The window that opens will be a command prompt.

  2. Switch to the directory in which the script is stored:

    cd c:\script_directory_name_here

  3. Run the script with “CSCRIPT.EXE”:

    c:\script_directory_name_here>cscript.exe "Silent Runners.vbs"

    Note that the quotes are mandatory.
top



Q:  I double-clicked the script file, but I got the error: Could not create object named “WScript.Shell”   What should I do?

 

A:  This means you cannot run any VBS script on your system. The best thing to do is to reinstall the Microsoft Windows Script Host.

For Windows 98 and Windows Millennium, the Windows Script Host is no longer offered by Microsoft.

For Windows 2000, click here.

For Windows XP, click here.

Download the file, install it and try running Silent Runners again.

top



Q:  I double-clicked the script file, but I got the error: This script requires Windows Management Instrumentation to run. However, I checked and that service is already running. What should I do?

 

A:  This means that Windows Management Instrumentation is not working correctly. Per the procedure posted here and confirmed here, you need to rebuild the local WMI database. It’s a procedure that’s not officially supported by Microsoft, but it’s of very low risk and it’s worked for many users with this problem. Here’s what to do:
  1. Stop the Windows Management Instrumentation and the Windows Management Instrumentation Driver Extension services
  2. Delete all the files in the folder %SystemRoot%\System32\Wbem\Repository
  3. Reboot.
The files in the Repository will be automatically rebuilt when Windows reboots. Try running Silent Runners again.

top



Q:  When I run the script, I get a window telling me I have a corrupt WMI installation and recommending that I download and run WMIDiag.vbs. What’s this?

 

A:  This means that the script can connect to WMI, but it can’t do anything with it, not even determine the name of the operating system. Windows Management Instrumentation is running but it’s definitely not working correctly. Microsoft developed a non-destructive diagnostic tool that examines the WMI installation in great detail and produces a lengthy log file reporting its findings. The tool can be downloaded here. After you download it, double-click it to extract “WMIDiag.vbs“. Double-click that (and press the “OK” button) to run it. It will create a log file starting with the words “WMIDIAG” and the extension “.LOG”.

If you can’t understand the log file, zip it up and send it to me as an e-mail attachment. I’ll try to help you.

top



Q:  I double-clicked the script file, but I got the error: Windows Script Host access is disabled on this machine. Contact your administrator for details. What should I do?

 

A:  If you’re connected to a domain, then do exactly what it says, contact your Administrator.

If you’re not connected to a domain, then this means that Windows Script Host has been disabled on your PC via a registry setting. Contact me for a fix.

top



Q:  When I run the script under Windows XP, I get a window telling me about a “CreateTextFile” error? What’s this?

 

A:  Windows XP users occasionally run into a problem and the script is unable to save its report file. You’ll see this message window:

The "CreateTextFile" error is intermittent under Windows XP

It’s not caused by any bug in the script code and I’ve witnessed the same error on my own PC’s. The error will come and, suddenly, it’ll go and not come back. The best way to get around it is to run this script version (“Silent Runners RED.vbs”).

It should run without any problem. After it finishes, rerun the original version (the one that had the error). It should now run normally.

If you find the cause or a workaround, I’ll pay you $25 (or 20 €).

top



Q:  When I run the script, I get some other error message. What should I do?

 

A:  Contact me. If you find a bug in a non-beta version, I’ll pay you $10 (or the equivalent in euros). top



Q:  How do I uninstall Silent Runners?

 

A:  Delete the file “Silent Runners.vbs”. top



Q:  I downloaded Silent Runners but I can’t find it. Where did it go?

 

A:  You’d best look for it using the search function built into Windows.

In Windows XP, click on Start | Search

In Windows 2000 and Windows Me, click on Start | Search | For Files or Folders…

In Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT 4.0, click on Start | Find | Files or Folders…

top



Q:  The output file contains “Infection Warnings” <<!>> and/or “Hijack Warnings” <<H>>, but none of them seems to show anything dangerous. Why is the script showing me this stuff?

 

A:  If the script finds non-default values at particularly powerful launch point or browser hijack locations, it will preface the line in the output file with the symbols <<!>> or <<H>> and will place an explanatory note in the report footer. This does not mean that the PC is infected. It does mean that such lines are atypical and bear very close scrutiny.

top



Q:  How did I get the adware infection?

 

A:  Windows wasn’t originally designed for use on the Internet. One look at all the launch points that exist for Windows programs will attest to that. So, given the ease of installing programs that start up every time Windows starts up and the liklihood that you’re running as an Administrator (the UAC controls of Vista and Windows 7 don’t change that) so that you can install programs that inherit your privileges so they can install other programs, it’s no surprise that malware is a problem.

top



Q:  How can I avoid reinfection?

 

A:  Log on to your computer as a “Limited User” and limit Internet Explorer to the few sites that require it. Surf prudently. Keep Windows updated. See additional advice here.

Updating or replacing your PC so you can install a newer version of Windows is not required, but it’s what PC salespeople, Microsoft PR-people and spoonfed journalists would like you to believe.

top



Q:  I have another question, but I don’t see it here. How can I get an answer to my question?

 

A:  Ask me here.

top


Copyright 2013 by Andrew Aronoff